photo by Aaron A.

Sean Yoro: The Viral Artist on the SUP Board!

Xavier in Stories

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

Giant women have been spotted afloat on bodies of water. These creatures are actually the doing of a Hawaiian-born artist who goes by the name Hula. Hula whose real name is Sean Yoro, creates stunning portraits of women on walls of waterfronts. Being a native of Hawaii, Sean only found it natural to ride the waves.

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

But what really grabbed people's portraits is the fact that these works of art seems to be surrounded by nothing but water. When he was then asked what inspired him to do it, he replied to CNN with, "I grew up on Oahu, where I was surrounded with everything nature has to offer."

Sean Yoro / Facebook
Sean Yoro / Facebook

Sean Yoro recalls leaving is hometown of Oahu with nothing but $800 and two boxes of clothes and art supplies, for the city of New York. College wasn't a part of the plan, he only wants to take the best he can get from the experience. Though his works are often presented as murals, Sean Yoro himself describes it as street art. Where in an Instagram post, he writes, “Now entering the street art game. Better grab my surfboard, paints, and get as far away from the street as possible.”

Having said that, Sean Yoro's work is a definite level up to street art. His isn't a brand of art you can see in numerous walls in NYC where your wall piece will be plastered over by stickerbombs and spray paint in less than a week. Sean's works aren't one to be easily found by some street punk. Seeing that his works require a boat ride to get to them, his works are going to be a challenge to mess with—that's if they ever find them. Sean said that he paints in an undisclosed location.

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photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

photo by Aaron A.

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

One thing you'll notice about the Sean's waterfront girls is the presence of patterns of lines on their skin. Sean explains that the body paint is associated with Hawaiian culture. It's meant to seem as if the paint has been dragged along the skin to represent people's burdens. "They represented the unique scars from life we all have and carry with us. I wanted to show how people interact to their scars and, more importantly, the beauty and importance of them," he tells Huffington Post.

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

Despite knowing that acrylics is what's cut out for this type of art, Yoro's choice of medium is oil paint. Oil paint isn't the best to use in this condition because nature has a way of hastening the paint's deterioration. To which Yoro replies to HuffPost with "I love the aging process and what nature does to the paintings." He adds,  "It feels natural to create these paintings and let them go." He doesn't mind the decay, in fact, he relishes in it.

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

Yoro’s waterfront girls portrait are an exquisite reflection of his experience as an artist. The dreary walls represent the concrete jungles he escaped his tropical haven for. While the concept of the art calls for wading through the water and the use of water as a visual illusion aid is to attach his work to his roots in Hawaii. To prevent potential slip-ups, the artist used standup paddleboards twice his size to make the job easier.

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

From berlin-artparasites to 9gag, these girls are everywhere. But sadly, Sean Yoro wasn't credited well until now. Nonetheless, Sean enjoys what he does and takes the time to find ways to keep things interesting.

photo by Aaron A. / Hula
photo by Aaron A. / Hula
the_hula / Instagram
the_hula / Instagram
photo by Aaron A. / Hula
photo by Aaron A. / Hula
photo by Aaron A. / Hula
photo by Aaron A. / Hula

Have we mentioned that Sean Yoro is also a tattoo artist? He's reportedly to have dabbled in tattoos when he was younger. Aside from painting waterfronts while balancing on a standup paddleboard, Sean likes to paint surfboards among other stuff.

photo by Aaron A.
photo by Aaron A.

When asked about his next art escapade, Hula isn't certain either. That's because he doesn't base his craft on planning, rather a gut feeling or a sudden burst of idea and passion which drives him to do what he does. But he sees more water murals and 'some figures who blend in with their environment' in the near future.

Visit his website and follow him on Instagram and Facebook!

Credit to Aaron A. for the photos he took of Hula. Follow him on Instagram.

Xavier

@Xavier

When she's not writing for Tattoodo, Xavier likes experimenting with art and organizing local music shows. We're kidding, she's probably asleep. Follow her on Instagram @claudia_strife

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