Whimsical Floral Silhouettes by Tedd Hucks

Whimsical Floral Silhouettes by Tedd Hucks

See if you can tell the difference between Hucks' floral silhouettes and the real thing.

Nature is one of those subjects that the art world continually comes back to for endless inspiration, as there is genuinely nothing more beautiful than wind moving through tall blades of grass or the perfect and natural intricacies of a fern’s leaf. Artist Tedd Hucks knows this better than anyone, as his pressed botanical tattoos perfectly mirror the real deal. For centuries now, the art of flower pressing has transcended both time and culture, popping up in ancient Egyptian tombs, the Middle East, and even as far as Japan. There is something about the preservation of flowers and plants that’s endlessly fascinating and beautiful. It’s a glimpse into the past, and  a reminder of our ties to the earth, keeping us rooted in a way. Hucks’ pressed plants are the perfect reflection of these sentiments, that keep the person receiving the tattoo with one foot firmly rooted in nature.

Hucks calls Ontario home, a province that’s largely known for its’ natural beauty, so it’s no wonder why he’s never at a loss for inspiration. Calling on the likes of Queen Anne’s lace, prairie dropseed, and tall blades of orchard grass as a few of his many muses, Hucks’ floral work, which he refers to as the “Shadows Tattoo Project,” is made to resemble the silhouette of a plant, and it falls nothing short of the real thing. In fact, when laid side by side, it’s hard to distinguish the tattoo versus the real shadow, and if it weren’t for the obvious fact that the tattoo is presented on top of someone’s skin, you might mistake the tattoo for the real thing.

A man of many talents, and many flowers, Hucks also dabbles in illustrative botanical pieces, often incorporating elements of dot work and fine lines, but the most impressive works he creates are without a doubt the ones that incorporate the two styles seamlessly. The juxtaposition of the organic matter represented in the botanical silhouettes against the backdrop of fine lined geometric frames and dot work is phenomenal, and calls to the forefront the relationship between geometry and organic matter. So whether you’re a fan of pressed flowers, moody shadows, or the dichotomy geometry found in nature, Hucks’ work might be right up your alley.

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