From Sea to Shining Sea: Hometown Tattoos That'll Make You Homesick

From Sea to Shining Sea: Hometown Tattoos That'll Make You Homesick

Whether you’re a product of the Windy City or Beantown, we think these destination tattoos might just be the cure for your homesickness.

It’s difficult to say for certain which city in the United States incites the most hometown pride, but whether you’re a product of the Windy City, the Lone Star State, or Beantown we think these destination tattoos might just be the cure for your lingering case of homesickness.

Chicago is known for many things — the Cubs, the wind, and producing one of the most popular, level-headed Presidents we may ever know. Did you know that it is not, however, the windiest city? Contrary to popular belief there are several cities that are much windier than Chicago — Honolulu, Boston, and New York. The windiest city in the US is Mt. Washington, New Hampshire. Chicago’s nickname was derived in 1885 when Charles Dana — editor of The New York Sun — published an article that referred to the city as such because the politicians that spoke there tended to be long winded.

Most everyone knows Texas as the Lone Star state, but did you know that Fort Worth is the only place in the world that hosts two daily cattle drives? At the Forth Worth Stockyards National Historic District, cowboys can still be seen atop their horses herding Texas longhorns down the cobblestone lined streets at 11:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. daily.

Los Angeles is the City of Angels, but did you know that the famous Hollywood sign that has become so synonymous with the city once read “Hollywoodland?” Built in 1923, the sign is made of 45-foot white letters, but in 1949 the city voted to remove “land” to reflect the neighborhood of Hollywood rather than the Hollywoodland housing development it was initially named after.

Boston is home to The Red Sox, the Wahlberg brothers, the best lobster rolls in the entire country, and the Great Molasses Flood. On January 15th, 1919 a tower holding more than two million gallons of molasses burst due to unseasonably warm weather in Boston’s North End. The incident caused severe damage to buildings and killed 21 people. To this day, the residents of the North End claim that you can still smell the sweet aroma on hot summer days.

It may be a major metropolitan area now, but during the ice age New York City and its surrounding areas used to be one large sheet of frozen tundra. When the climate began to shift, the rock and gravel underneath the ice formed parts of New Jersey, Long Island, Connecticut. Parts of the glacial formation can still be seen in the rocky terrain of Central Park.

You might not be able to name every state capital off the top of your head, but by the time we’re done with you, you’ll be spouting off random facts about the US at the drop of a hat. Like we said, we’ve lived in a few different places.


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