Converse Tattoos Make Excellent Convers-ation Pieces

Converse Tattoos Make Excellent Convers-ation Pieces

We expose Chuck Taylor as a liar and look at tattoos built upon said lie

Welcome to another edition of Hail Corporate, our semi-weekly look at branded content that we in no way get paid for. We’re committed to bringing you tattoos of the hottest brands out there, and this week is no different. Today, we’re looking at Converse tattoos. Let’s face it, we all wear shoes, and some of us wear the company’s famous Chuck Taylors. But who was Chuck Taylor? As always, we’ve got the answers that you crave, so strap in as we cram your brain with knowledge and sick tattoos.

The Converse All-Star shoe was introduced in 1917, and a young Chuck Taylor began wearing them while playing high school basketball in Columbus, Indiana. In 1923, Taylor traveled to Chicago to the offices of Converse in hopes of landing a job. He was hired on the spot.

He quickly suggested some changes to the shoe to provide better support and flexibility. Most famously though, he suggested adding a patch on the ankle for protection. The All-Star logo was quickly added to the patch, and by 1932 Chuck Taylor’s name was added, and the Chuck Taylor All-Stars were born,

Taylor claims to have played pro ball from 1918 to 1930 for the Buffalo Germans and Original Celtics. However, no record of his playing exists. What’s the deal? Did Taylor lie about his athletic career to help sell his shoes? If so, why bother? The shoes were already a smash hit before he began telling tales of his pro career. The very idea that someone would lie to sell a product shocks us to the core.

No one seems to care, as the shoes remain immensely popular both with ballers and non-ballers alike. No one also seems to mind the fact that the company was sold to Nike in 2003. Are Converse produced in worker-friendly environments? No one cares. They look cool and have a great history.

We’re sorry to rock your world by exposing Taylor’s lies, but the truth shall set you free. Even if it does, you surely still can appreciate these awesome Converse tattoos.

Do these Converse tattoos make you want to lie about playing professional basketball just like Chuck Taylor did? Well, join the team. I personally averaged 12 rebounds a game with the Indiana Pacers in the early 2000s.

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